Burroughs Corporation

Burroughs Corporation
Item# 1582
$16.00

Burroughs Corporation
The Burroughs Corporation began in 1886 as the American Arithmometer Company in St. Louis selling an adding machine invented by William Seward Burroughs.

The company moved to Detroit in 1904 and changed its name to the Burroughs Adding Machine Company, in honor of Burroughs, who died in 1898. Burroughs grew into the biggest adding machine company in America, although by the 1950s it was selling more than the basic adding machines, including typewriters and computers.

In 1953 the Burroughs Adding Machine Company was renamed the Burroughs Corporation and began moving into computer products, initially for banking institutions.

The company moved to Detroit in 1904 and changed its name to the Burroughs Adding Machine Company, in honor of Burroughs, who died in 1898.

Some important dates in the company’s history:

1911 - introduces first adding-subtracting machine.

1923 - introduces direct multiplication billing machine.

1925 - introduces first portable adding machine, weighing 20 pounds.

1953 - introduces first 10-key adding machine.

1959 - pioneers use of magnetic ink character recognition (MICR).

1961 - introduces the B5000 Series, the first dual-processor and virtual memory computer.

1980 – Burroughs’ golf scoring service first introduced at the 109th Open Championship Muirfield, Scotland.

1986 – Sperry (formed in 1933) and Burroughs merge to form Unisys Corporation.


Certificate: Registered Bond, unissued/canceled, 1990’s

Printer: American Bank Note Company

Dimensions: 8” (h) x 12” (w)

State: DE-Delaware

Subject Matter: Adding Machines and Typewriters | Computers and Related | Unissued Pieces

Vignette Topic(s): Allegorical Featured | Male Subject | Nude Subject

Condition: Vertical fold lines, punch hole cancels in the signature areas and body, and some toning from age.





All certificates are sold only as collectible pieces, as they are either canceled or obsolete. Certificates carry no value on any of today's financial indexes and no transfer of ownership is implied. Unless otherwise indicated, images are representative of the piece(s) you will receive.